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History of Arbor Day
The Creation of Arbor Day
Julius Sterling Morton
The first Arbor Day took place on April 10, 1872, in Nebraska. It was the brainchild of Julius Sterling Morton (1832-1902), a Nebraska journalist and politician originally from Michigan. Throughout his long and productive career, Morton worked to improve agricultural techniques in his adopted state and throughout the United States when he served as President Grover Cleveland's secretary of agriculture. His most important legacy is Arbor Day.

Morton felt that Nebraska's landscape and economy would benefit from the wide-scale planting of trees. He set an example himself planting orchards, shade trees and wind breaks on his own farm and he urged his neighbors to follow suit. Morton's real opportunity, though, arrived when he became a member of Nebraska's State Board of Agriculture. He proposed that a special day be set aside dedicated to tree planting and increasing awareness of the importance of trees.

Nebraska's first Arbor Day was an amazing success. More than one million trees were planted. A second Arbor Day took place in 1884 and the young state made it an annual legal holiday in 1885, using April 22 to coincide with Morton's birthday.

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